WordPress.com Email lists, Newsletters and Privacy

news eventsThe two primary reasons bloggers offer email newsletters are to promote their posts and/or products/services. But keeping a newsletter going is no easy feat because subscribers suffering from digital overwhelm as we all are, may be tempted to unsubscribe.

Promote your Posts, Products and/or Services

Some say collecting email addresses is one of your most powerful tools as a blogger. Providing subscribers with content not found on your blog in an email newsletter is a means of marketing products and/or services and driving traffic to your blog. Automated newsletter campaigns can include not only your blog subscribers but also your social media followers.

Starting a newsletter is a great way to drive more readership and create a stronger bond with your readers, but in order to do this, you must remain enthusiastic! Newsletters aren’t a one and done type of deal… you have to keep at it to see results. – Primp My Blog: Build a Better Blog Newsletter

Privacy

It’s important for bloggers to recognize that when an email address is provided for a specific purpose, such as for receiving posts from a blog or for submitting a comment to a blog, that is the only purpose it is being provided for, and any additional use of it is unauthorized. In some countries, for example, Canada, it’s illegal to use an email address for any purpose other than the specific purpose it is provided for.

WordPress.com vs WordPress.org

There is no FTP access and no blogger installed plugin capability on free hosted WordPress.com blogs. There is no upgrade you can purchase that changes that. So if you want to set up an AweberConstant Contact, FeedBlitz or GetResponse  email list for high powered email marketing campaigns then you will need to hire a web host and set up your own WordPress.org install.

However, the inability to use plugins on a free hosted WordPress.com blog doesn’t completely rule out sending newsletters to subscribers.

Related posts found in this blog:

Create a WordPress Website Step By Step
WordPress.com Follower Management
WordPress Followers, Likes and Stats
Blogging, Bean Counting and Social Networking
WordPress.com: Who Follows Who?
Blogging: Attracting More Readers
WordPress.com in house blog promotion
How to form blog centered relationships

13 thoughts on “WordPress.com Email lists, Newsletters and Privacy

  1. Pingback: Canada’s Anti-Spam Law | one cool site

  2. Pingback: Eventbrite, Mailchimp, Pelican Cards | Light Reading

  3. I’m sorry if I’m missing something obvious, but if email addresses provided solely for the purpose of receiving post updates cannot be used for any other purpose, how does a subscription widget work as newsletter subscription? Is it okay simply to change the language above the widget to “Subscribe to posts and newsletter by email” or something like that? Tried to ask this question on your post about newsletters, but the comments were closed.

    Kathy

    • Hi Kathy,
      The subscription widget subscribes a person to every post in the blog. By creating a second blog that’s solely for publishing a monthly (weekly, biweekly, etc. ) newsletter and setting up a subscription widget there readers could get the newsletter separately. After doing that you can create a custom menu on the main blog and include a custom link to the newsletter blog in the custom menu.

      P.S. I’m sorry about the closed comments on the earlier post. This blog attracts far too much spam to leave comments open on all posts.

  4. Pingback: Helpful Links for WordPress.com Bloggers | one cool site

    • Hi Kathy,
      Sheesh! Look how far behind I am when it comes to answering comments. I’m so sorry you waited this long. We have entered a timeframe when newsletters are becoming more an more common so I thought it would be a good idea to share what’s possible here at WordPress.com.

  5. Thank you for the information about the MailChimp newsletter signup.

    I have incorporated a Mailchimp signup form now, but instead of a text link I made a small graphic that looks similar to the Mailchimp form. That way, when anyone is interested in it, they are taken to something that continues with a similar visual message.

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