Content farming fertilized by Facebook

Facebook has a page spam definition:  anything intended “to confuse, mislead, surprise, or defraud users.”  But does it go far enough?

What is spam and what is misleading?  Why doesn’t Facebook  consider filling your account with images you’ve stolen from other sites so you can spam links to an otherwise empty blog and sneak in affiliate links to be misleading? Click in and read this informative article revealing how content farming is fertilized by Facebook.

“Content farms work by publishing millions of low-quality fluff articles every month. Google’s search algorithm loves them. Readers hate them.

And much like those sites, which hurt Google by devaluing its core purpose of providing relevant search results, spam networks are ultimately corrupting Facebook. ” Read the full article here >  This Facebook page you like is actually spam

Will the post I linked to above be in top place for article of the week with the Facebook set? What say you?

10 thoughts on “Content farming fertilized by Facebook

  1. Hello, I am so sorry to talk about this in an unrelated post, by I need your help and couldn’t find a contact info! It is about your translation page (it is the only one working so far for me, and I would like to add a English button because my primary language is portuguese) are you able to help me? So sorry again! Thanks

Comments are closed.