Spelling and Grammar Count

grammarIf your title is effective and your introduction is engaging you are off to a good start. But keep in mind that when spelling is atrocious and grammar is ignored meaning gets lost. Readers today have little time and patience. When it comes to reading long, poorly constructed posts that wander all around the point without making it – forget it! They have already clicked out.

Good grammar is credibility, especially on the internet. In blog posts, on Facebook statuses, in e-mails, and on company websites, your words are all you have. —  I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.

What and how you write it matters. Unlike the humble conversation, written communications are lasting. Long after the exact wording of a spoken conversation has been forgotten, written material languishes – complete with any errors you may have made. —  Spelling and Grammar Cheat Sheet – Erica Mills

Do spelling and grammar matter when evaluating content and site quality?

Proofreading and editing are very important blogging skills

All good writing is focused on clarity. Improper use of language leads to miscommunication and can also convey the wrong concept. The better you are at language use, the easier your writing is to read and the less chance there is of misunderstandings occurring.

Before you begin proofreading, make sure your document is reader-focused—with a clearly stated main point, clear organization, easy-to-read formatting and concise language.  —  Proofreading Well

The best method of proofreading for you will depend on your budget, your timescale, your work, and your own ability. If you are using a cost free tool, it is a good idea to use a wide range of sites.  —  Proofreading and editing tips

Though they don’t catch every error and do miss homonyms and plural/singular errors, automated spell-checkers do catch most spelling errors.

Automated grammar checkers are not as accurate as proofreading performed by humans but they are becoming better tools so don’t be afraid to use them. — 5 free Grammar Checkers for Bloggers and Writers

Addendum:

shoreacres  “Just one addition – grammar and spelling count in comments, too. When I respond to people, I’m as careful as if I were posting a blog entry.

I try to keep a conversational tone, and if someone comes in using the no-caps, slightly abbreviated forms common in texting and so on, I don’t correct them, but I’m very conscious of the value of being equally attentive in comments as in posts.”  –The Task at Hand: A Writer’s On-Going Search for Just the Right Word

An excellent resource:  The Guide to Grammar and Writing

Related post: Top 5 Informative Writing Tips for Bloggers

30 thoughts on “Spelling and Grammar Count

  1. I tried multiple times to click on the section “How to Avoid Tag Woes” and it brings up the Grammar and Spelling page – they are the same. Something wrong? I was wondering if there is a difference between putting a Post topic as a Category or a Tag in relation to how the topic searches come up with Posts in Reader, etc. Is one more effective than another? Does it matter? Does listing the same word, like Consciousness (for example), under both Category and Tag help, hurt, or do nothing different? Thanks for your help!

  2. how hide category and tag from front page of wordpress blog?
    my theme is Mystique and my blog is
    if you wish, plz give me your email id also..
    Thanks

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  6. This is a very helpful blog for a newbie like me. I often struggle to convey my point and it causes me to get wordy and off task. I’ll definitely follow this blog from now on. Ciao ♥

  7. This is one post I am saving!

    I am very conscientious of my grammar and punctuation; especially commas, semi-colons and colons. (did I use the semi-colon correctly?). I checked out the links and I find them very helpful.

    Thank you,
    Cyndi Heath
    Lakeside, MT

    • Hi Cyndi,
      I’m not a grammar and punctuation specialist. This post was inspired by my realization that I needed to brush up on what I learned way back when I was in college.

    • Thanks Kathy,
      I appreciate your HUG. The long weekend is approaching and my friends will be arriving. We will be on the beach catching up on what’s happened and making new memories.

  8. “is is” in your first sentence is distracting, too. ;) I double and triple check before I publish and still find mistakes. You wouldn’t believe the corrections and changes I make after I’ve published. Sometimes weeks or months later!

    • @piedtype
      How embarrassing. I proofread this article several times and missed that double word in the very first sentence. Thanks for letting me know it was there so I could edit it.

  9. Spelling and grammar are important aspects to writing that I don’t think get enough attention. Thanks for that attention. Speaking for myself; I can use all the help I can get. ;)

    • When it comes to needing spelling and grammar help count me in that number too. And you can add me to the punctuation help required numbers as well. :)

  10. Just one addition – grammar and spelling count in comments, too. When I respond to people, I’m as careful as if I were posting a blog entry.

    I try to keep a conversational tone, and if someone comes in using the no-caps, slightly abbreviated forms common in texting and so on, I don’t correct them, but I’m very conscious of the value of being equally attentive in comments as in posts.

    • That’s a brilliant addition and grave oversight on my part. Thanks for bringing it forward. I’m going to edit my post and it include it.

    • No spellcheckers are perfect but they are helpful and proofreading more than once is a good way to catch errors. Thanks for your visit and your comment too.

  11. The thing about grammar is getting the perspective right. I have spent ages wondering whether to use the “Oxford Comma”. I am writing an informal blog; is the use of a semicolon too formal. When considering all these minor points I fail to notice that I have a sentence that stops right in the

    • I hear you. I was educated very formally and I’ve lost my way. I have bad habits as well as bad eyesight and my app doesn’t catch some errors that are glaring obvious when you can see well. I have a sentence structure habit of grouping three items in sentences and that leads to fretting about using the “Oxford Comma” … I don’t use it anymore.

      I have a sentence that stops right in the
      lol :D

      Thank goodness subscribers don’t get notified every time we edit after publication.

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