Kogan Imposing Tax On Shoppers Who Use IE7 | Lifehacker Australia

A year ago WordPress discontinued support for Internet Explorer 6. Even Microsoft is counting down to IE6′s extinction! If you try to log in to your Dashboard using IE6, it will be broken and you’ll see a red alert box that provides a link you can use to upgrade your browser version.

According to StatCounter, IE7 users comprise 1.5 per cent of total Web browser users worldwide as of May 2012.

Electronics entrepreneur Ruslan Kogan, Australia’s richest person under the age of 30, won’t be wasting money on catering the outdated IE7 browser.

Online electronics retailer Kogan is no stranger to novel pricing approaches, but this one takes the cake: from now on, anyone who visits the Kogan site using IE7 will be charged an additional 6.8% “IE7 tax” — 0.1% for each month since the browser was released — on any purchases.  via Kogan Imposing Tax On Shoppers Who Use IE7 | Lifehacker Australia.

14 thoughts on “Kogan Imposing Tax On Shoppers Who Use IE7 | Lifehacker Australia

  1. Kogan’s move sounds reasonable to me, tho it’s a wonder they didn’t just pull the plug on IE7 and say supporting it could no longer be cost-justified. Great news item, however!! : )

    • Hi Mark,
      I feel the same way you do. Everyone who is running windows XP like I am cannot upload an IE9 browser. The latest version we can use is IE8 but then againg I’m a Firefox user. I knew 9 years ago the IE6 was dog (pardon me all beloved cancines the world over) so I downloaded Firefox.

      P.S. I do have post in the works that I’ll be publishing as soon as I complete it.

  2. Of course, it costs his company more. apparently, only around 3% of the Kogan’s customers still use IE7 – but Kogan’s development team has to spend as much time ensuring its pages work on that browser as they do for Chrome, Firefox and Safari combined. Anyone who wants to escape the additional fee simply has to upgrade and I can’t see why anyone would “cling” to an outdated browser version. To me a browser is just a tool. IE10 is in development and IE9 is the most recent stable version. The popup that says: “It appears you system administrator has been in a coma for over five years and you are still using IE7. o help make the internet a better place, you will be charged a 6.8 per cent tax on your purchase from Kogan.com.” and ends with links to download browsers from Google, Mozilla, Apple. Mozilla and Opera.

  3. Do you realize how ironic this is?

    Maintaining old software does cost his company more. Why should he maintain pages for a dying browser, which has bad security.

    And why should government attack him? Isn’t government supposed to protect? Shouldn’t the governments be stopping all the browser attacks, security holes, and financial theft centered out of China, Russia, and the USA? And of course, Brazil.

    But, the great irony is WordPress blames their problems on browser issues. When their problem is they don’t, or maybe cannot, fix their software problems.

    So, we want the courts to tax this guy for telling the truth.

    And wordpress gets a free pass because of what?

    WordPress has cost me so much, I have to move to a real platform. It will be cheaper to learn Joomla ….

    I say tax wordpress, and a thank you to Kogan.

    IMHO.

    Wayne

  4. I guess he could call it a fee instead. In my version of reality it’s technically not legal for even the government to impose taxes, but that’s a rant for another day.

    • The word “tax” does have an emotional/legal ring to it doesn’t it? I agree that “fee” would be a better term to use.

  5. Doesn’t sound legal to me. But if Australian law lags as far behind technology as U.S. law, there may be no existing law against it.

    • I freely admit I don’t know anything about Australian law. Customers have a choice, either upgrade IE and avoid the tax or shop around and find alternative.

    • Why do you say that? Everone in business has the right to set a fee for services and products. No one is compelled to use a single vendor. If there is no law prohibiting it, then there can be no cause of action, so there will be nothing for any court to conisder.

  6. What do you think, TT – is the Kogan tax actually legal? If so it opens the floodgates for any profit-mad fruitcake to levy whatever extraneous charges they feel like. In Oz, at least.

    • I really don’t know Ron. It’s an amazing move to make and whether or not it will be upheld if challenged in court is unknown.

Comments are closed.