Blogging Tips: Unused Blogs

email symbolThe unique identifier at WordPress.com is the email address one uses to register a  username account with.  One can register as many WordPress.com blogs as they wish — there is no limit. If you want another blog registered under the same username your are currently logged into at WordPress.com then point your browser to the WordPress.com sign-up link to register your new blog.

Sometimes WordPress.com members are disappointed to find that when they attempt to register a new blog the URL is already in use. They visit the subdomain and discover that the blog is unused and their hopes of acquiring it soar.  They presume that they can simply contact WordPress.com Support Staff and have them remove the unused blog from it’s owner and reassign the blog to them, or they post to the WordPress.com support forum where they are informed this is not possible.

There is no requirement that one has to use a WordPress.com blog they have registered under their WordPress.com username.  How frequently a blogger chooses to post to their blog, or if they choose not to post at all, is not of concern to Staff.

The only alternative one has if they find they are faced with the fact a WordPress.com subdomain blog URL they desire has been registered by another blogger and the blog is unused, and one is determined to try and get it, is to contact the blogger who registered that blog.  If the comments are open on the blog or if there is contact information one can contect the blogger in question and ask them to transfer the blog to another username account.

question markIf the blogger who has registered the unused blog cannot be contacted then WordPress.com Staff will not provide  contact information. WordPress.com (Automattic) privacy policy is clear;  Staff will not violate the privacy of the blogger who registered the unused blog by releasing their contact information. The blogger who registered the unused blog is free to return at any time and blog in it or not. The choice is theirs. So if you cannot contact them or if you can and they do not wish to transfer the blog to you here are two options:.

  1. You can register another WordPress.com subdomain URL that’s very close to the one you originally desired and use it.
  2. You can register another WordPress.com subdomain URL and purchase a domain name and domain mapping. If you do purchase your own domain and domain mapping then it won’t matter what the root blog WordPress.com subdomain URL is.

Wherever possible your blog  title should be evident in the URL. For good SEO include keywords in the URL and tagline that reflect your “brand”.

Note that when a WordPress.com blog is deleted the sub domain URL cannot be reused by the party who deleted it or be recycled and used by anyone else.

Related posts found in this blog

Bloggers Get Your Own Domain
How and why to get your own domain
Creating a new blog

25 thoughts on “Blogging Tips: Unused Blogs

  1. Pingback: Basic WordPress.com Tips for New Bloggers « one cool site

  2. Good luck in trying to “contact” the blog owners. In many cases people have realized blogging wasn’t for them, abandoned the blog and have gone off to never-never land to be with Peter Pan.

    Unfortunately, many email addresses / contact info associated with the blogs are also no longer valid and the blog you want (or URL) is in limbo.

    *sigh*

    • That’s true. So many blogs are abandoned within months of their creation. Email addresses can be discontinued on the few that do have contact information.

  3. What kills me is when you actually own a domain name, and someone on WordPress is “using” it but will never be able to own it. You would think most bloggers would want to own their own name but I suppose if they aren’t serious about it they don’t care. It’s a real pain if what they are writing is garbage, you don’t necessarily want to use it on wordpress.org or another blogging platform for fear of someone confusing the two.

  4. Thank God I haven’t had to go through this. I prefer using my own domain for my blog rather than one through WordPress. These are great tips especially for those who are using WordPress to host a blog. Thanks for the tips, Timethief!

    • Hi Alyson,
      I have domains for my main blogs. The rest are private blogs mostly used for testing and with links for answering questions on the support forum. Thanks for your interest. :)

  5. We can contact them about the used URL if we have their contact information but sometimes this is hard because they don’t use it anymore.

    • Yes if there is no contact infromation then the two options I point to in my post are all that’s available. However, if one is a committed blogger then purchasing a domain and domain mapping is worth it.

  6. Please help – I have a WP blog http://mikeemslie.wordpress.com/ but when I try to login WP tells me that my user name mikeemslie (I double checked with the first email they sent me) is not valid – so I cant even login to get help. I left a comment on facebook bu thaven’t had any reply when I last looked.

  7. Well, I was pleasantly surprised that my blog domain name had not been used at the time I registered. I have several blogs.

    • Hi Jean,
      I’m glad you were able to acquire the domain names you wanted. There are domain name squatters who make an income from purchasing domain names on speculation and then reselling them for higher prices.

  8. timethief ~ that’s a great tip to contact the current blog owner – if they have contact info on their blog – and ask if they will transfer the little used blog url to you. Thanks for that.

    • Hi Sandra,
      You’re welcome and thanks for your comment. As time has marched along and there are fewer and fewer sub-domain names available unused blogs are coming into the spotlight. In some cases the bloggers who registered them did leave comments open and/or did post contact information. When approached some do consent to transferring them and in others they don’t. When there is a means of contact then it’s worth a try but IMHO purchasing your own domain is the way to go if you know you are committed to blogging over the long-term.

  9. Hi TT!

    It definitely is frustrating to learn that a domain name has already been taken, despite all efforts at conceptualizing and mapping out the direction of a blog site/blog project.

    I have to ask, does transferring a blog to another user account on WordPress.com free up the domain name of that blog? I understand that when you delete a blog on WordPress.com, the domain name for said deleted blog still wouldn’t be available.

    Thanks very much for this informative blog post! Keep the WordPress.com and blogging tips coming! :D

    Cheers!

    • Hello there,
      Question: “I have to ask, does transferring a blog to another user account on WordPress.com free up the domain name of that blog?”
      Answer: “No” Once a blog is deleted the sub domain URL cannot be reused by the party who deleted it or anyone else. This support entry stats why there is no recycling of blog names at WordPress.com > http://en.support.wordpress.com/recycling-blog-names/

  10. Hi TT,

    The situation that you describe can be frustrating. Like many, I ran into the same problem with a barely used Twitter username. At least, in that case, it was actually someone’s name, so I understand. Similarly, this occurs with unused or parked URLs. I recently sought to acquire a URL that was unused for my company. The URL is not even a real word, but it is the name of our proprietary software application. The demand for this URL cannot be high, yet the offered price was nearly $17,000. Acquiring this URL is not central to our business, so I rejected the offer, but I can’t conceive of them finding another buyer. Ray

    • Oh no! I missed replying to your comment. I’m so sorry. I have turned full moderation back on because when I tried moderatee first comment only for a brief time this happened. Thanks for sharing your experience. As you have highlighted there are unused blogs to unused URLs and usernames of social networking sites. In the case of URLs there are domain name squatters who purchase on speculation with an aim to sell for more than what they are worth.

      • Ha, TT. No problem at all. Didn’t you get my tweet? I always subscribe to comments, so I was reminded that I was just hanging out there each time someone commented on this post. :)

        The negotiations ended with my rejection of their price. There haven’t been any follow-up offers, so I guess that the URL owner has decided to hold out and take his chances. Ray

        • Hi there,
          I did get your tweet today. I have not signed into Twitter for several days maybe a week as I had company and was overextended at work too.

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