Thumbs down on WordPress Reblogging

I’m a big WordPress.com fan and I do want my blog to increase in popularity but I value readers and commenters more than I value “traffic”.  I believe the intention of the new “like” and reblog feature was to assist WordPress.com bloggers to get wider blog exposure.  However, I say thumbs down to the copy-cat from Tumblr WordPress.com “like” and reblog feature. There is no provision for opting out. We can opt out of possibly related posts so why can’t we opt out of this feature too?

The Reblogging Feature Announcement

Have you ever come across a blog post that you enjoyed so much you wanted to easily share it with the readers of your own blog?  We All Like to Reblog

  1. timethief
    June 1st, 2010 at 5:58 pm
    Is there an opt-out option or are we compelled to allow others to reblog our posts?
    Andy P
    June 1st, 2010 at 6:21 pm
    There’s no opt-out as it stands, but allowing others to reblog your posts will ultimately bring more people in to read your blog. If you’re concerned then you can still make a post private, or your entire blog private.

timethief
June 1st, 2010 at 6:17 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
I asked this question above: Is there an opt-out option or are we compelled to allow others to reblog our posts?
When I posted it I forgot to state the reason I asked it is because it directly relates to copyright. WordPress.com does not hold copyright on my blog contents. Myself and my guest authors do. What benefit in other blogger reblogging our entire posts on their sites. Why would their readers click through to read the original when the full contents have been “reblogged” without our permission? Why should we be compelled to take part in a scheme that robs our blogs of traffic and gifts those who are too lazy to research, write and publish their own post on the same topic. What benefit is there to those using search engines to find the SERPs returning duplicated content. rather than unique relevant content?
Thank you, in advance, for an reply that specifically addresses the copyright issue and the ability to opt out of this “reblogging” at your earliest convenience.

This comment “in moderation” has not been posted as of June 3, 2010 @4:38 PM.

The Reblogging Experiment

Today Richard (thesacredpath) tried some experimentation with the new wordpress “like” and reblog feature.  He reblogged my Basic Netiqueitte for Beginner Bloggers post and then he reblogged his reblog of my post.

The Reblogging Results

1. All links to the original article are gone in the second-generation reblog.The read more and site link at the bottom of the second-generation reblog link back to the second blog, NOT to the original.

2. The possibly related posts links to the reblogged post, NOT to the original.

Limitations of Fair Use

Here’s a good summary of the limitations of fair use from Jonathan Baileys article The Limitations of Fair Use.
1. Focus on commentary and criticism: Make sure that you are using the work to talk about it. Using a passage from a book to review it, quoting from an essay to rebut it or showing a clip from a TV show to comment on it are all likely fair uses.
2. Use as little of the work as possible: Use short quotes when practical and only thumbnails of images. Really hone in on what you need to use and leave out anything you don’t.
3. Attribute obsessively: Always make sure that you attribute the works you use, not just to help strengthen your point, but to show good faith. Though not always important to a fair use argument, it discourages any potential conflicts before they happen.
4. Focus on transformation: Finally, and most importantly, make sure that your use of the work does not replace the original, but expands upon it. When using someone else’s work, as yourself the question “Do people, after seeing my use of the content, have a reason to view the original?” If the answer is no, then the use is much more questionable than it would be otherwise.”

So readers, what’s your opinion of the value of this wordpress.com “like” and reblog feature?

Read also:
Say No to the Plethora of Exclusive Like Buttons
Is WordPress.com now a Social-Networking/Micro-Blogging Platform?
Reblogging

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144 thoughts on “Thumbs down on WordPress Reblogging

  1. I don’t know what WordPress hopes to gain, by making it easy for people to take other people’s work (instead of doing their own). I woke up this morning and found out that someone had taken 5 of my recent blogs and posted them on something called “Scoop It.” These same posts were also reblogged on this person’s WordPress site improperly. Photos were moved around or deleted, and my initials were even removed from the end of my poem “Flowers Blooming Bright” (which was cut and pasted together without the photos between the verses).
    Now I am either going to totally delete my blog or go private–I have not decided yet which way I will go. But I will go. I just posted a notice on my webpage to all the good and honest people who have liked and followed my blog. I am angry.
    http://storieswithnobooks.com/2013/08/06/literary-thief/

    • Hi there,
      I hear your unhappiness but let’s put this in perspective. Content theft by copy and paste and by RSS Feed is and has long been rampant. “People have been reblogging others’ posts since blogging started, but our new reblogging system enables authors to retain greater control over their content.” Providing a properly attributed excerpt of your content for reblogging purposes in your RSS Feed is promoting your content.
      http://en.support.wordpress.com/reblogs/

      However, what you describe is not reblogging; it’s a copyright violation.
      “… my initials were even removed from the end of my poem “Flowers Blooming Bright”.

      I’d like to make you aware of these steps you can take here at WordPress.com, provided the offending site is free hosted by WordPress.com:
      http://en.support.wordpress.com/content-theft-what-to-do/
      http://automattic.com/dmca/

      With regard to scoopit.com it’s a legitimate content curation site. This is a link to their copyright policy SCOOP.IT INC. Copyright Policy. http://www.scoop.it/copyright-policy

      Hope this helps and wishing you all the best.

      • I’m with tt on this.

        Initially I was totally against reblogging, assuming, from the limited information I had that the whole post was to be hijacked, which turned out not to be the case, it’s just the first para or two (Mary, as tt said, you’ve been ripped off, not reblogged – follow her advice).

        Now I’m happy to be reblogged – a lot of my stuff finds its way onto Scoopit these days and, recently, being too ill to write, I’ve taken the plunge and, on two occasions, reblogged the work of others – I just wish people would realise they should post comments on the source blog, not mine – I deserve neither credit nor condemnation for something I didn’t write but merely thought worth sharing.

        A word of advice about reblogging – ensure that whatever you reblog, it meets the standards you’ve set for your own blog. Plonking down a slab of text by someone who can’t punctuate, or doesn’t know paragraphs exist, or why, when you can do these things without having to think about it, will introduce a terribly jarring note which will not thrill your readers. And no, rewriting someone else’s material so that it does meet your standards simply isn’t on. Either reblog, warts and all, or don’t do it. And if you encounter a blog written by someone who doesn’t know, or care, where the spell-check button is, don’t even bother with it – if they don’t care, why should you?

  2. Hi timethief – I just received notification of my first reblog. I wasn’t sure what that meant so I googled and found my way to your post. I’m not sure what to think. Am I reading correctly that I can click approve to complete this reblog, or there is nothing I can do at all?

    I’m not sure if I like this feature or not?

    Here is the reblog: http://pushdumpfatbutton.wordpress.com/2012/05/25/strawberry-banana-smoothie/

    And here is my post: http://wp.me/p2loA8-md

      • Thanks timethief – I did read that article before I posted here, but didn’t get to the comments (so many, thanks for including a link to that specific comment). I read this part – see below, and that’s what threw me off (the “you might need to approve it first”) part.
        ________________________
        “An excerpt of your post will be published on the reblogger’s site (with a link back to your original post), and you’ll receive a reblog notification in the post comments (you might need to approve it first)”
        ________________________
        At least I’m not alone in my thoughts :) Can I ask you what to do with the notification? Just delete so it stops showing up in my notifications?

        Hope you don’t have to work this weekend!
        Thanks again.

  3. Hello, timethief, et al -

    You said above that:

    “Fair Use means that people have the legal right to take small quotations (and even a thumbnail, if it is small enough) from your content with or without your permission. “

    That’s not quite true. People can utilize a bit of accredited content within certain guidelines, but not universally across the board. Even Jonathan Bailey says in the above linked article:

    “The types of uses that are considered fair are actually very narrow in scope.”

    I can imagine very few instances where a “reblogger” would capture content that applies to the Fair Use Doctrine, but perhaps the WP staff might call me unimaginative? On the US Copyright Office’s “Fair Use” page, they wrote:

    “Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.”
    http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html

    So that eliminates the rationalization many “rebloggers” offer when they help themselves to someone else’s work, that they aren’t plagiarizing because the reblog thingy gives credit to the original (or as you’ve seen, most recent) incarnation of the work.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the WP executives have adopted a new business model that they imagine will make the site more marketable. Perhaps they are looking for a buyer?

    (If I got the HTML tags wrong, feel free to laugh!)

    • I have left issue behind me. I chose to accept what is and move on as the only other alternatives are to (1) move my blogs off wordpress.com free hosting onto self-hosted wordpress.corg installs, or to (2) have them remain on wordpress.com free hosting but set the blog visibility to “private”.

      In order to reblog a post one has to be logged into wordpress.com and click the “like” button on the top gray navigation bar. See here for how not to enable that “like” button on your posts so it won’t appear on the navigation bar. http://en.support.wordpress.com/sharing/#like-button

  4. Pingback: Reblogging, and countermeasures… « wordpress tips

  5. Hi TiTi,
    Matt asked for two weeks on 6th June…. three weeks have now passed.
    Do you know, is it “open season” again yet on this ?
    Or has Matt maybe run off and hidden in the hope that the furore has died down and we’ll all forget about it ?

  6. Though initially I had liked the re- blogging idea but soon realized after reading the comments in forum, that someone can really survive and get traffic by reblogging alone..
    I mean this- probably he/she would create links and become a search engine sort of and en-cash upon other bloggers…
    You are right when you say that we want some real subscribers or viewers. May I add that- and not be around like a thousands of books lying in the book shop without any title- slip..
    It’s like scrapping the original content.. and without the author knowing about it; or even without any credit be given to him :(
    Actually not done..
    Ever since this has been up, I have noticed a downfall in my traffic too- obviously, they have read it, why would they now come to my site now??
    I so wish that WP.com realizes and enable an opt out feature; but are they listening??

    -Olivia

  7. Hi Timethief

    I tried to reblog a Time Magazine feed about Kevin Costner’s oil centrefuge separator and the reblogging feature tried to reblog a completely different article.

    My post about the reblogging problem is here and maybe you would try to reblog the Costner article, or perhaps of your readers would try it to see whether you get the same problem.

    I’d like to know how the reblogging can go wrong without someone manually coding the feed to deliver the wrong article.

    • Hi David,
      OMG! You comment slipped right by me. I didn’t reblog the post you referred to. I had one hell of a week. I’m in pain and haven’t slept for days. I’m going to pass this on to Richard, okay.

    • David, I just tried it, and left a comment on your blog post. I also did not get what I expected. What I got was the latest posting in the newsfeed. Apparently the only thing it is allowing you to reblog is the latest post – whatever that may be – from the newsfeed. I tried it on a couple other newsfeed posts and got the same results.

      Definitely either broken by accident or on purpose.

      • Yes, you are right – it pulls in the latest post. Even stranger is that I just tried a reblog from ‘Time’ using what looked like the latest post (on tropical storm Alex) and it pulled in another post (on Timothy Geitner). So I pulled in the ‘Geitner’ post and it reblogged the ‘Alex’ article.

        I copied the text in to the comment section on my post, as a record of what it pulled in. The reason is that I am not sure what can actually change on my posts over time because after all – what I have pulled in is a feed within the same overall WP system….

        I have submitted it to WP Support as a bug, on the principle that reblogging does not work as intended, even though the error may emanate on the ‘sending’ blog rather than the ‘recipient’ blog.

  8. I don’t understand your point Kothea in your 2nd paragraph.

    But perhaps you inhabit a different world.
    I would suggest then it would be hard to teach children how to think AND write with creativity, relevance and be original in thought, if adults continue blindly the path of wholesale, mass copying without permission.

    How would people here propose to teach the ethics of plagarism to the next generation without learning how to cite/credit their sources of information?

    • Great question Jean. If the adults of this generation have no respect for copyright then how indeed will they teach the next generation not to plagiarize, but to properly cite/credit their sources?

      • @KOTHEA –
        This article is posted in a wordpress.COM blog that’s being hosted by wordpress.COM. The feature being discussed is only available to wordpress.COM bloggers and apparently you aren’t among that number. It’s my opinion that your continued commenting here amounts to trolling. That’s why I have posted the last comment from you that I will approve on this matter.

  9. I’ve used this new feature and I like it.

    I’ve also told someone who copies my posts and presents them as their own that perhaps the re-blogging feature is a good alternative way to go! For this reason alone it is a great feature.

    Anyway. just to bring to everyone’s attention something off at a tangent (but related): if you edit the html of the re-blog and put in /nofollows then wordpress seems to take them out again.

    there i said it!

    • Reblogging is a tool for the fake bloggers who do not and/or who cannot not to create original content. Suggesting that reblogging is a tool that will prevent content theft is fallacious and if you don’t know what a fallacious argument is then I urge you to find out.

      The correct alternative for content thieves is to get busy offline, preferably on the end of shovel somewhere in a community garden, and give back to society rather than remaining online poaching the work of others, and passing themselves off as bloggers, when most if not all, are sploggers.

      There I said it. And I said it in a polite way rather than shouting – bullshit!

      • OK. I have a circle of followers of my blog. I find some useful content. It will take me too long to write the content in my own words. I ABSOLUTELY DO NOT WANT TO PLAGIARISE IT, as I never can agree with that. However the re-blog feature let’s me share it whilst giving credit to the author. That is not plagiarism.

        Now if I had a blog where I solely re-blogged then that certainly raises ethical issues. but I don’t do that.

        Re-blogging allows those that I have re-blogged to gain potential new traffic from my blog. Fine that’s OK and fair enough.

        I can’t see the problem so long as the link is properly accredited. Which it is as it is a url++.

        Furthermore some people obviously don’t like this feature. So it would be perfectly reasonable to let them opt out of the re-blogging network.

  10. Perhaps the only thing that can’t be stolen:

    A person’s life story, a person’s family and a person’s relationships with their closest, loved friends. And all the real-life stories that derive from that. And make that blog public to those same people to confirm the authenticity of the unique blog stories. Make them your witnesses also to whatever you publish.

    If I should start naming my family members, my loved ones in blog postings and someone wishes to reblog, then some folks have truly the fallen down along the path of low morality.

  11. Pingback: WP Reblogging: How Discouraging! « Scribe's Express

  12. One of my articles got “clipped” by another blog using Clip-to-Blog (Clipmarks) which is usable on Blogger, WordPress, Typepad, Vox, Live Journal, and Movable Type.

    The origin of the clip – my blog – is in teeny, teeny letters and not large ones and in the title like in the WP Reblogging feature. And the clip sure had a lot more than 50 words. Yes, there was a linkback (that’s how I found out about it).

    It looks like the day and age of Clip-to-blog and Reblogging are here, and I’m not sure there is much we can do about. WordPress seems to simply be trying to keep apace with the same blogging feature being offered by other venues. Even without reblogging, we are going to get “clipped” and who knows what else.

    Do you think putting the “Do Not Copy/Copyscape notice” at the top of each page makes a difference?

    • @Sandra Lee
      I’m so sorry I missed this comment of yours somehow. I don’t know if the copyscape notice will be effective or not but I am using it.

  13. Well, I’ll be the first to admit, that I don’t know what the chuckEcheese all this Twits about anyway, or the tweet, or Re-tweet or twEATme…but, I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express Last Night….

  14. I’d like to thank you for writing this and bringing it to wider attention, timethief. I hear the forum threads on it have been blocked? I couldn’t be bothered to go look.

    Almost as bad as encouraging plagiarism is the extortion angle. In order to prevent this happening you have to pay WordPress the upgrade? This is a downgrade, if anything.

  15. Is there any other blog sites that have the quality themes and tools that wordpress.com has that isn’t going the way of social blogging which wordpress.com appears to be following?
    I think Word press is banking on people not paying attention to their blogs.
    I also think they are banking on people not wanting to take the time to move their blogs.
    But if they are going to mess with my intellectual property rights and say screw you if you don’t like it, I for one will drop them like a hot potato in July.

    I have been thinking about including parts of my book as I’m putting it together but I’m certainly not going to do that if they’re going to start allowing re-blog!

  16. One thing that the lofty of WordPress seem to forget is that even though their main portion of bloggers are getting free service, it’s always been the high quality and non facebook like nature of word press that has drawn us here.

    As I said in the forum, they are opening themselves to litigation with this new ploy to bring more members.

    Do they really think their paying members are going to put up with this kind of invasion into our intellectual property? This is tantamount to bringing over a marauding horde of vikings to your town and letting them rape and pillar the town and say it’s going to bring more taxpayers to your citizenship.

    Thanks but NO thanks!
    I for one am unemployed and can’t afford the css upgrade and that is why I chose Word press in the first place, because it set itself apart.

    If they are going to have the childish and moronic attitude of “It’s our sandbox and if you don’t like how we’re screwing you, go play somewhere else.” I’m thinking they will probably regret their idea sooner or later. One can only hope it’s sooner not later. I like everyone else have invested a lot of time in setting up my blog on wordpress and not only do I not want people stealing my ideas, but I don’t like not having the ability to chose what happens to my blog.

    It can be argued in a court of law that the space which our blog sits, belongs to wordpress, but the intellectual property that resides on that site belongs to the user and as such we should have any and all rights under federal and international copy right agreements to control how that property is used and dispensed.

    I think this is a very arrogant move on Word Presses part, an unbelievably arrogant move.

    • It can be argued in a court of law that the space which our blog sits, belongs to wordpress, but the intellectual property that resides on that site belongs to the user and as such we should have any and all rights under federal and international copy right agreements to control how that property is used and dispensed.

      So therefore the host has a moral responsibility, within reason, to help protect those rights rather than to offer plagiarists an easier method of performing breach of copyright.
      Rock on, 1P !

  17. Pingback: To Stay or To Move? « Novroz' Favorite Things

  18. Hi TT,

    Matt’s claim that this will drive traffic to our blogs is a crock.

    OK, for those, like you and a few other forum stalwarts, who have blogs aimed at, and popular with, WP users, I can see that happening. However, for most of us, I suspect it will have little or no benefit.

    Whatever the true motivation behind this function, I sincerely doubt it has much to do with increasing traffic to blogs. Unless, of course, Matt, and others at WP, really do believe that all WP users spend their time reading each other’s blogs. Which would be worrying.

    Ron.

    • @Ron
      I don’t think there’s any benefit in speculating on motivation. IMO whether or not the intention behind these features was to increase traffic is not in question. Whether or not they will is another issue. And as for me I’m seeking targeted readers. I don’t want a high bounce rate created by one time click in and outs. I’m seeking more regular readers and subscribers.

    • @Amit
      I have Tumblr blogs I use for posting videos and brief quotations. I don’t mind if they are reblogged. However, when it comes to the blogs I do create content for then it does matter to me and that’s why they are on wordpress.com and not on Tumblr.

  19. Thanks SO much, timethief – I’m all fixed up.

    Not only that, with my new CSS upgrade I can fix a thing or two about my theme that I’ve never liked ;-)

  20. I have one wp.com blog and really hadn’t seen this. It not so bad for the blog I have there, good even, but if it were my personal blog I’d be pretty perturbed and have to leave.

    • G’day Cooper,
      It’s good to see you (your new avatar). I don’t believe that all wordpress.com members are even aware that the “like” button and “reblog” feature have been activated.

  21. @timethief … wow if it is turning into a social networking…it’s gonna be bad, if I want to write in social networking, I would have written in my FB notes rather than in my blog.

    Let’s wait for Matt’s 2 weeks notice…will he allow us to talk about it again or keep closing every thread related to reblogging.

    What do you think? Do you think he will let this matter clossed or open for discussion again?

  22. I am horrified. I am a writer. I spend hours and hours on original content. I engage with my readers. I have spent years building a following. My words are MINE, grown of my own experience.

    This is simply enabling content theft.

    If this goes through I will have to leave WordPress.

    I am just devastated.

    • @shoreacres
      I hear you and I do want to tell you that these “like” and “reblog” features are already functional. Therefore it’s not a matter of “If this goes through … ” because both were activated as of June 1st. If you click any title of a post on a wordpress.com blog and then look up at your gray navigation bar you will see the Like button and if you click it then you will uncover the reblog feature.

  23. Wow this is very concerning and an issue that everyone needs to be aware of. Thank you TT for having our backs on this one and getting the word out about the possible implications that this plug-in will have on blogger’s content and protection of our work.

    • @RecycleCindy
      Hi there. Yes, this is a concerning issue because as it stands the reblogging feature amounts to wp.com advocating and inviting other members to use their tool to violate my posted copyright policy. Here at wordpress.com the “like” button and “reblog” feature are embedded into our top navigation bar and we can only remove them by purchasing a CSS upgrade. As I have said somewhere up there in the comments I don’t cotton to purchasing upgrades to remove unwanted features. I would prefer to see wp.com TPTB provide an opt-out option and I have no idea why they have not done so. The fact that Matt chose to close the forum thread is disturbing and more disturbing yet is what he said:

      matt
      CBBQTT
      Jun 6, 2010, 7:40 AM

      “I usually don’t like closing threads, but there seems to be a spiral of misinformation going on here. People are confusing our feature, which drives traffic to your blog, increases engagement, and builds your community, with spammers who leech off the internet.

      I would like everyone to try out this feature for two weeks. See if your blog disappears from Google, if aliens come and attack you, if your traffic goes up, down, or stays the same. Reblog a few posts and see what it looks like. Like a few things. In two weeks I’m happy to have a discussion with everyone on their concerns, ideas, bugs, and hugs, but we really need people to actually use and comprehend the feature first!” http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reblogging/page/5?replies=147#post-472791

      • Hi TT, Iread this last night and That is the weirdest reply so far! I was shocked by it.

        What is it that makes them want to keep this reblog feature so bad? I really am wondering now.

        • @Novroz
          I believe that Matt is stating his intention for the introduction of the feature ie. “which drives traffic to your blog, increases engagement, and builds your community”.

          The rest is in IMO defensive posturing. I am not in the least confused about copyright and Fair Use and I have not misinformed anyone. It’s my guess that what makes him so defensive about this feature is that it’s most likely chained to the “vision” he has for the future of wordpress.com. Too bad it’s a vision that he has failed to share with the members. I could be wrong but I expect that we may be seeing more copycat and knock off social networking features in the near future.

  24. TiTi

    You know how new I am to blogging, with that being said,, after reading this article and valuable commentary I don’t know how my own will stand up. For what it’s worth I’m against it. And this is what nailed it down for me:

    1. All links to the original article are gone in the second-generation reblog.The read more and site link at the bottom of the second-generation reblog link back to the second blog, NOT to the original.

    I’ve a lot to learn about blogging TiTi ….but that’s just wrong!

    • Hello there,
      It’s good to see you but what’s with the old man avatar? lol :D

      We all have a lot to learn about blogging because it’s not frozen in time — it’s unfolding and evolving. That being said I don’t like the way microblogging and Twitter and Facebook have changed it and I simply will not be playing the build a bigger army than the other guy game. Nor will I become a fake rancher, if and when that’s introduced at wp.com (just joking).

  25. I don’t understand why people don’t just copy and paste and give complete credit.
    Why is word press making things easier for lazy people who are plagiarizers anyway?

    Rather than just linking to an article I typically add the post or article and link to the article. I feel if i’m just linking to the article I’m not really giving full honor to a guest posting so I both include the article with full citing and include a link so they can go see more articles/posts of a similar nature if people like it.

    If re-blog just ends up citing the copiers blog after a second re-blog why do they even bother telling people about proper citing efforts?

    • Hello there,
      Yes, the fact that the second generation reblog does not link to the original is worrisome and there is nothing we members can do about that. No matter what comes to pass I will still continue to backlink and to quote and properly attribute and cite my references just as I have always done. I will not allow any cutesy Facebook like button and/or copy-cat Tumblr reblog feature to disrupt my ethics and the way I blog.

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  27. Pingback: Do Really ALL of us want to Reblog ? | Phoxis

  28. I just reblogged this post of yours as a test and noticed that the reblog copied an extract that was 83 words long.

    I chopped out the last 33 words to get the excerpt under 50 words, as you require.

    I’m going to ask Automattic how the reblog decides where to end the extract.

    I also noticed that the link back to this site is a do-follow link, so that is the upside for the original site.

    [This is the 83 words it copied - it doesn't seem to me to be a better, more linguistically sensible place to chop the text than where I then chopped it to, after 50 words]

    The 83 Words
    I’m a big WordPress.com fan and I do want my blog to increase in popularity but I value readers and commenters more than I value “traffic”. I believe the intention of the new “like” and reblog feature was to assist WordPress.com bloggers to get wider blog exposure. However, I say thumbs down to the copy-cat from Tumblr WordPress.com “like” and reblog feature. There is no provision for opting out. We can opt out of possibly related posts so why

    • @Dave
      I’m getting a word count of 79. I am working today as well as babysitting so I apologize but I can’t really focus on this right now.

      • No sweat – I am not on a clock.

        At the moment I am writing a guide, using ScribeSEO (much better than I thought it might be), reading, and I am not babysitting.

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  31. “Here’s a good summary of the limitations of fair use from Jonathan Baileys article
    1. Focus on commentary and criticism: Make sure that you are using the work to talk about it. Using a passage from a book to review it, quoting from an essay to rebut it or showing a clip from a TV show to comment on it are all likely fair uses.
    2. Use as little of the work as possible: Use short quotes when practical and only thumbnails of images. Really hone in on what you need to use and leave out anything you don’t.
    3. Attribute obsessively: Always make sure that you attribute the works you use, not just to help strengthen your point, but to show good faith. Though not always important to a fair use argument, it discourages any potential conflicts before they happen.
    4. Focus on transformation: Finally, and most importantly, make sure that your use of the work does not replace the original, but expands upon it. When using someone else’s work, as yourself the question “Do people, after seeing my use of the content, have a reason to view the original?” If the answer is no, then the use is much more questionable than it would be otherwise.”

    I agree with all of the above comments in this excerpt. Haven’t had time to read entire thread. The excerpt serves as a fair, balanced reminder of how to quote only relevant sections and give full citation for original source and original author. Seems to me some folks have become really lazy in terms of citing and original thought expression– meaning folks at WPress. However certain development folks believe they are being “innovative”.

  32. This new “reblog” (read: plagiarize) feature is making me rethink the value of this otherwise decent blogging platform. The glib answer you received from Andy P. seems more informed by an age of tumblelogs and tweets, not actual blogging. What would big media companies like TimeWarner or the New York Times say if their content was handled in such a cavalier fashion? Sad.

    • Hi Mark,
      Yes … sigh … sad is the word for it. Obviously, rethinking by TPTB would be welcomed. The options suck and it’s really hard for those who have always held this platform in high esteem to be in a position of rethinking too. :(

  33. @Timethief thanks for the info. Now, I have to do a lot of thinking between paying or moving out.

    Do you think WP might reconsider this matter in next few weeks?

  34. Pingback: Customer Dissatisfaction | The WYSIWYG* Blog

  35. Hi Timethief,…For once, I hate WP new feature…I always like WP features and it makes me love WP more and want to make more Blogs in WP.

    But this totally SILLY new feature called reblog sucks!! I’m not saying that WP has to erased this feature, I can see some people are enjoying it…But an opt-out is a MUST because WP has to respect others who don’t want this feature.

    Yes, my blog doesn’t have high traffic but I enjoy my blog a lot, I like what I write and I want what I’ve written stay in my blog.

    I like WP so much and now I’m in deep dilema…to stay or to leave!! I want to stay so bad but I’ll be furious if someone reblog my post. I have just reported a blog that copy-paste my content, now, how can I report other WP blog if reblogging is allowed?

    • @novroz
      I hear you but unfortunately wordpress.com staff do not appear to have any intention of providing an opt out feature. The position being taken by wordpress.com appears to be that their reblogging feature does fall within the parameters of Fair Use. This announcement was made on June 1st and it’s now June 4th. We are not singing the song they want to hear and IMHO this is a lost cause.

      apeatling
      Key Master
      Jun 4, 2010, 10:36 AM
      “I’m only seeing around 30 unique posters on this thread concerned with reblogging, out of multiple millions of WordPress.com users. ” http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reblogging/page/3?replies=92#post-472197

      I believe that where it stands is that those who do not like the feature can:
      purchase a CSS upgrade and remove the unwanted feature;
      make their blogs private;
      or leave wordpress.com.

      • Yeah I’ve seen the forum *again* and leave some thought for apeatling. He/she seems to forget that there are also people who can’t speak English who object to this.

        How much is CSS cost in a year? this might be a useless way of spending money but it’s one of the option afterall :(

  36. I don’t understand how you can use CSS to remove this feature. If it’s removed from your nav bar, doesn’t that mean you no longer can reblog, but how does that stop others from reblogging your posts?

    • No, you can block the the like/reblog option from appearing in anyone’s admin bar when they visit your blog. See http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reblogging/page/3?replies=86#post-471965
      Although the admin bar only appears to logged-in users and draws the content of its tabs from their information, it is still part of the CSS structure of each individual blog and as such can be blocked, in whole or in part, with display:none. (However, as timethief says, it’s probably not worth buying the upgrade just to do this one thing.)

      • @DB
        I bought CSS yesterday for one of my blogs, coincidentally the one where the copyright issue is of most importance to me, so thanks very much for that tip !

        I’m really miffed though that one has to pay for it on a blog-by-blog basis. Grrr. They sure can pitch things at the best level for them when they think about it, can’t they ? But that’s for another thread…..

      • Dave – I followed your link in this post – and notice it reads like this (and I confess to cutting and pasting right now!!!

        one can block only the like/reblog button without blocking the rest of the admin bar by applying [removed -- modifying your admin bar like this is grounds for suspension]. Would it …

        It looks as if WPress edited in the bit in brackets?

        But I followed the link to your mom’s blog and see the like/reblog is NOT there, so … so far, so good.

        Dave, either you or Timethief have any comments on this apparent comment from WP about this? After reading this thread here I was reaching for my credit card to buy the CSS just for this purpose, now I’m wondering. thanks.

        • Oh crap. You know, I did hesitate to leave that comment for fear they might retaliate, but I said to myself, it”s not a violation of the TOS, and don’t be paranoid.

          Looks as if I should’ve been more paranoid. My urge to be helpful overruled my instinct for self-preservation.

          No, I don’t think you’d better purchase that CSS upgrade.

  37. TiTi, thanks to you and Richard for getting this conversation going. When I read the announcement, I didn’t really get the point, to be honest. I envisioned a shrinking circle in which WP bloggers simply circulate and re-circulate the same posts ad nauseum. Yes, that may boost traffic but it feels to me like “McBlogging” – fast and easy and over 8 gazillion sold, but somehow not necessarily filling, satisfying, nourishing, or appetizing! I may be an aging Luddite, but the proliferation of the light, breezy social networking trends do not appeal to me. You can add my vote to the Opt-Out option movement, for most of the reasons presented in this thread.

    • @Rachel
      What you call “McBlogging” is the status quo in social networks now. Everyday I see the same posts tweeted and then stumbled and sometimes Dugg, etc. What it comes down to is who has the biggest army of pseudo friends/followers? Those who have thousands of followers are flooding the blogosphere with duplicate snippets and like you I’m not into playing that game.

  38. it feels like wp.com wants to implement a feature that people recognize from elsewhere, maybe to attract more bloggers from those platform.
    i am only very new at wp but have been reading cross platform for a long time and i always liked the relatively high level of quality and ‘wordy’ posts here.
    i was stunned on the introduction and posted about it, and i am not surprised there is great resistance, especially if you can’t opt out, and if, like it seems, uncomfortable questions of established bloggers are not answered in public.
    still, there are many comments of very happy bloggers in the feature announcement and i am just hoping that in the end, most of the wp bloggers true to their own style, write and publish their own content, and if not, quote following ‘fair use policies’ and linking morals.
    I don’t see wordpress going back on this.
    time will tell.

    • @kaykay
      Yes both features are available on other sites (Like button – Facebook and reblogging – Tumblr). No I don’t see wordpress.com backing down on this either. The announcement was made on June 1st and it’s June 4th. If an opt out option was going to be provided IMO this would have already happened but it hasn’t.

  39. Well, even though I personally have applied a liberal Creative Commons license to my own work, I respect those who feel differently about sharing their work and do agree that Automattic f’d up by not including an opt-out. I don’t really think they should be imitating Tumblr, a tawdry operation that thrives on porn, and I agree with timethief about the shallowness of the reblogging culture in general.

    One easy way for them to institute an opt-out would be to stop charging for a dang CSS modification. Then anyone who objected could simply block the whole ugly useless gray admin bar, as we do at qarrtsiluni. (Doing so strikes me now, with this Like + Reblog button, as imperative for any serious journal hosted on WordPress.com.)

    • @Dave
      Yes. I know they could do that simply because a web developer friend told me so. However, I doubt that they will stop charging for the CSS upgrade, and I don’t want to be placed in a position of having to purchase upgrades to remove unwanted features. I strongly believe we ought to have been made aware of this “surprise!” and provided with a means of opting out without payment of any kind. We don’t have to pay to disable possibly related posts and the idea of paying for a CSS upgrade to remove this feature irks me.

  40. Just as I feared. This will be a sweet shop for those who want to nick our content. We all like to reblog they say. Not all of us. An opt out button, or something would be a win win situation for everyone. A big thumbs down for me.

    • @pienbiscuits
      If management tell Staff to do it they can deactivate the button on the gray Admin bar on the blogs of those who members who want to opt out of the like/reblogging feature being available for use on their blogs.

  41. Hey TT!

    I’ve seen your comment on the post on WordPress.com announcing this feature, along with several others questioning about an opt-put option.

    I stand that this feature should have an opt-out option and shouldn’t have been made mandatory.

    The title of the post, We All Like to Reblog, irks me. If we all love reblogging, why are there those who are not pleased? Of course we all don’t want to reblog. I was shocked at the outcome of your experiment with Richard. In this case, the reblog feature is like allowing every blogger to freely copy content over cyberspace without much reference to its origin. Definitely an issue on plagiarism. Taking this in mind, I am inclined to think that WordPress.com doesn’t give that much importance to the blog posts/content being published by their users. It’s like they assume that their bloggers don’t give that much value to their posts and that these can be shared casually or improperly. It’s turning into a very casual social networking environment; deviating from the protected and and sharing-friendly environment for writers. It also indicates a high importance for SEO over content quality since this reblog feature strives for deriving more traffic.

    The introduction of a reblog feature does away with the "share this" buttons/links that we put on our blogs. I actually find this method of sharing more acceptable than using the reblog feature–links to the original post are shared, instead of portions of its content.

    I agree with thewitcontinuum that we should let our side be heard directly to WordPress.com. An online petition for an opt-out of the reblog feature maybe? Hope something could be done.

    Cheers!

    • @Rogue|Hero
      Like you when I read the announcement title I replied – NO! I think they thought they were gifting wordpress.com members with a feature that we would all embrace. Reblogging and posting snippets everywhere has become common place and providing a tool to make it easy would make them good guys. Let’s face it there are many people who are habituated to clicking “like” and “retweet” or “thumbs up” buttons and they do like doing it. I sure hope our community will not turn into a very casual social networking environment.

      • Hey TT!

        I would like to ask your permission to quote 50 words from this post, specifically on the results of the reblogging experiment that you did with Richard. I’m going to do a post on this reblogging feature of WordPress.com. I will definitely include a credit/source link at the end of the post and a trackback/pingback.

        Looking forward to your approving response.

        Cheers!

        P.S.: I couldn’t find your email address anywhere so I opted to leave you a message through the comment form.

        • Hello Rogue|Hero,

          Yes, you have my permission to use these 53 words:

          The Reblogging Results
          1. All links to the original article are gone in the second-generation reblog. The read more and site link at the bottom of the second-generation reblog link back to the second blog, NOT to the original.
          2. The possibly related posts links to the reblogged post, NOT to the original.

  42. I was not that concerned, I felt many do this sort of thing anyway. At least there would be an automatic link provided through the reblog feature. But, Richards reblogging experiment makes me not like it. I have to say thumbs down. Unless there is a way to fix that, and even then I think an opt out option is needed.

  43. This is the comment I wrote on the WordPress.com blog/announcement about this feature; it is awaiting moderation at the moment:

    I would like to request WordPress.com to include an opt-out option for the reblogging feature.

    This feature enables copyright violation, in particular the ability to easily save whole copies of my posts. My copy does get stolen from time to time and I have my RSS feed set to summary so as not to enable copyright violation. Fortunately, I have that option with the RSS feed, but this is not the case with the reblogging feature. Sure, copyright violation happens, but this feature makes it easier.

    Since the reblog feature will automatically include a thumbnail of original artwork that may be in a post if it’s the first image, it appears this may be an automatic copyright violation even if fair use allows the use of a written excerpt.

    The reblog feature places my blog title as the title on someone else’s blog post. Even if it says “from x, y, z blog this seems very odd. There is also the issue of the duplicate content and duplicate title affecting Google page rank.

    When I write about another post or blog, I do so in the context of my own article using an appropriate excerpt, not the first section by any means. I don’t title my post with the other blog’s post title. In that way, the reblog feature is of no use. I can see it’s handy if you just want others to take note of a blog, but this needs to be considered in light of all the other questions at hand.

    Then there are the problems that occur when a reblogged post gets reblogged again, including lost links.

    Lastly, it’s not appropriate to tell serious bloggers with high reader counts who are actually enthusiastic WordPress.com proponents that they can just make their posts/blog private if they don’t like the reblogg function. I understand that it’s easy to unintentionally mis-speak when responding to comments, but an apology would be appropriate in this case.

    If WordPress.com would simply offer an opt out function, you could meet the needs of all your users. Thanks very much for your consideration.

    • @Sandra
      The reblog test that was done resulted in 75 words of my content and a thumbnail image. I don’t know if you are aware of this or not but that excerpt would probably be considered Fair Use. As it stands right now many bloggers don’t know that even if they post an All Right Reserved copyright notice, Fair Use means that people have the legal right to take small quotations (and even a thumbnail, if it is small enough) from your content with or without your permission.

      I was truly shocked that the solution suggested to me when I asked if there was an opt out option to make my blog “private”. I already knew from a web developer that the “feature” on my Admin bar could be removed quite easily.

      • @Sandra
        Here’s a good summary of the limitations of fair use from Jonathan Baileys article here http://www.blogherald.com/2008/02/18/the-limitations-of-fair-use/

        1. Focus on commentary and criticism: Make sure that you are using the work to talk about it. Using a passage from a book to review it, quoting from an essay to rebut it or showing a clip from a TV show to comment on it are all likely fair uses.

        2. Use as little of the work as possible: Use short quotes when practical and only thumbnails of images. Really hone in on what you need to use and leave out anything you don’t.

        3. Attribute obsessively: Always make sure that you attribute the works you use, not just to help strengthen your point, but to show good faith. Though not always important to a fair use argument, it discourages any potential conflicts before they happen.

        4. Focus on transformation: Finally, and most importantly, make sure that your use of the work does not replace the original, but expands upon it. When using someone else’s work, as yourself the question “Do people, after seeing my use of the content, have a reason to view the original?” If the answer is no, then the use is much more questionable than it would be otherwise.

  44. Seems odd that WP.com would dictate for all bloggers. I know that like ‘uniformity’ but this is too much! An opt-out is not too much to ask, indeed it’s expected.
    As for reblogging, after you ‘like’ a post you must then select ‘reblog’. According to the announcement the entire post is not copied — I however did not try it.

    This will auto-fill a snippet of the post text, a link back to the original post, and a link to the blog. If the post includes any images we’ll also automatically add a thumbnail image to the reblog post. Finally you can add your own comments to the reblog post then select which blog you’d like to post it to (if you have more than one).

    In Richard’s experiment, how big was that super snippet with images and links?

    I suspect WP.com did not do the testing that you did (they should have) and may be surprised by your results! [read embarrassed]

    • @SBA
      Hi. It’s good to hear from you. There were 75 words of text from the content in my posts and a thumbnail in the relblogged post. My copyrights says up to 50 words. You can see it here > http://opposablethumbz.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/basic-netiquette-for-beginner-bloggers-via-onecoolsitebloggingtips/

      In a comment on another post Matt writes,

      ” The admin bar belongs to the user, not the blog. How would opt-out work? Would they be able to favorite a post on every site powered by WP.com except for yours? Would we prevent copy and paste as well?”

      The copy and paste part is of course a red herring. I’m sure that those who created the feature must be aware of a means of disabling it because someone told me how they could.

      • @tt
        Surely, for the most part, if a user doesn’t want to allow re-blogging then it is likely that they will want that decision to apply to all their blogs anyway ? I think it’s more likely to be a personal choice rather than a blog specific choice.

        If somebody specifically wants different options at the Admin Bar level, as I do for one of my blogs, then quite simply register as a different user with a different email address. As most email hosts allow some sort of message forwarding it’s an easy step-around anyway.

        I have two user-id’s on WP, for the reason stated above, and logging out of WP from the top right of the Admin Bar takes me to the WP login page with the alternate user-id and password already entered, so it’s no hassle to switch from one to the other anyway, it fact I quite enjoy that ability.

        The “Like” feature is very useful, especially for somebody as disorganised as me who wants to follow something up later when I have time, but there is absolutely no reason why the re-blog aspect cannot be optional… even at the Admin Bar level. That’s just smoke !

        Keep up the fight, tt, you know I’m right behind you, but watch your back.

        ( Oh…. That didn’t come out the way I meant it…… ! )

        • G’eveing,
          Thanks so much for telling us how you approach this issue and what your experience has been and what you think too. I’m not fighting any battle. The time for TPTB to provide an opt out or make any adjustments seems to have passed. … SIGH

          Blogging on …

    • @K. Gregorovius
      This is such an unpleasant event. Here we are wordpress fans feeling like our community was so great because it wasn’t like Facebook, Tumblr, Myspaces or other cyber places and that’s going to be changing. I believe this may be only the beginning of more “social networking” features.

  45. I agree with the plagiarism thoughts here. I certainly wouldn’t want my post copied without links back to my blog–is that what I’m getting from the sacredpath’s Richard attempt?

    This is not good if true. I cannot believe the WordPress people didn’t consider this. I sincerely hope they don’t add more like/dislike/thumb-up-down buttons or what ever crap they find on other social networks. We are here to share info and knowledge and opinions and stretch our writing muscles. I considered this a serious platform for that, but now I question it. It is just as easy, as Writerdood says, to write your own short post about what you like with a link to the original blog.

    Can we express ourselves somewhere to let the managers know that we don’t like this? Do you think there is any hope that they will reconsider the whole thing?

    • Hello there,
      No. When Richard reblogged my post there was a link back to the original here on my site. He then reblogged the reblogged post to see what would happen as this is the way the rebloggers work.

      All links to the original article are gone in the second-generation reblog.The read more and site link at the bottom of the second-generation reblog link back to the second blog, NOT to the original. Adding insult to injury, the possibly related posts links to the reblogged post, NOT to the original.

      If you wish you can post to the forum thread here > http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reblogging?replies=73

  46. It’s also a ripoff of the Facebook “Like” feature.

    I think the fix is simple (someone correct me) — you should not be able to “reblog” your own posts.

    • @JP
      Yes indeed. The “like” button is like the Faceboook like button and the reblog is a Tumblr feature. As far as not reblogging your own posts goes, would you believe that a member who rarely blogs has published a post on how reblogging your own older posts can be beneficial. She rolls her eyes …

  47. Agree with @phoxis. And it’s a first…normally a huge fan of WP. Do you think they’ll take any notice? Agree with @timethief – and it would be very sad if they compromised a fantastic blogging platform.

  48. Pingback: Do Really ALL of us want to Reblog ? | Phoxis

  49. Does hitting the “Like” button automatically reblog a post?

    I started using it yesterday, figuring it might be a handy way to keep track of blogs I like, allowing me to jump to them from the menu. But I didn’t plan on using the reblog feature. That smacks too much of plagiarism to me. Why repost someone else’s blog entry on my blog when I can either leave a comment on the original site, or provide a link to it in a blog entry of my own? I mean, if I like someone’s content, I’m not going to repost it. I’m more likely to write a post saying I like it, saying why I like it, and then putting in a link to that post so that others can read it based on my recommendation.

    I look at the “Like” button as being similar to voting with a thumbs up, but also letting me track where I’ve voted and jump back to those articles. That’s kind of useful. But reblogging – that’s not something I’d ever do. In fact, I kind of thought it was odd that it was ever implemented.

    • @writerdood
      No you have to click another button after the “like” button to reblog.

      You have said: “I mean, if I like someone’s content, I’m not going to repost it. I’m more likely to write a post saying I like it, saying why I like it, and then putting in a link to that post so that others can read it based on my recommendation.”

      I say: Right on!

  50. Overhyped but I’ll give it a try. It seems like another form of the TrackBack function. I wonder if this will be a plugin for .org users as well..

    • @Phoxis
      I was horrified at first because as Richard has shared I have a personal awareness of how rebloggers reblog and reblog and reblog the original content. I’m also aware that the advent of micro-blogging has created duplicated content in the SERPs and IMO and in the opinion of many SEO professionals the result of this duplicated snippets of content is a dilution of relevancy of entries returned in the SERPs. I am also keenly aware of the impact that micro-blogging has had on authority and PageRank.

      Prior to Twitter and microblogging authority was derived from creating high quality content containing authoritative links that got backlinks. These days we are witnessing the power of social media broadcast range as duplicated snippets abound. I blogged about this here > http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2010/05/02/social-media-and-seo/

  51. @Sally
    Exactly, and I’ve just said so to WP. This whole idea sucks.

    @Richard
    There’s the usual waffle over at WP Towers – but hell, if WP said Hey, guys, we’re nuking you next Tuesday, it’d get the same hysterical, hyper-uncritical, response that everything, good or bad, gets. And this is bad.

    Reblogging, if there’s no opt-out, should be limited to just the first para or two, with a link to the post. Not just repost the whole damn thing.

    Ron.

    • @Ron
      I know you are addressing Sally and Richard but may I enter here please? This is what my copyright states:

      “A brief excerpt of content (up to 50 words) may be quoted as long as a link is provided back to the source page on this blog and the authorship is correctly attributed.”

      The full page can be viewed here > http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/copyright/

      I own my content and my guest bloggers own theirs wordpress.com does not hold the copyright to it. Copyright is vested in the creators. I am aware of the extent and limitations of Fair Use and that is why my copyright is worded the way it is.

      However, you will note that when Richard reblogged my post the reblogged excerpt was 75 words and not 50 words. In other words, my copyright posted here on this blog was violated. It went 25 words beyond what I believe to be the extent of Fair Use limitations for educational purposes. At the every least I would like to see the reblogged excerpts limited to no more than 50 words.

  52. Hi TT, and I guess you already know my feeling on all this. :-)

    I still cannot believe that .COM won’t even consider an opt out on this. I can’t help but think there are ulterior motives behind this, but I’m just not sure what they would be. They claim a lot of people have wanted it, but at least in the forums I’ve seen little evidence of that.

    {shrugs}

    • Hi Rich,
      We have had a forum thread or two of folks who want to have wordpress.com “followers” widgets. We have even had some members who stated if they didn’t get such a gismo they would leave … LOL :D

      They are the same folks who are distraught if their complete blog entry published originally here at wordpress.com doesn’t get auto-posted to Myspace and Facebook and pour out their misery on the forum. Most who do that don’t have a clue about the effects of duplicating content. Even after we explain the situation they are eager to rebroadcast their words ie. the same words everywhere every time they publish, and in turn have a button clicking army of pseudo friends and followers who will retweet (rebroadcast) it. yet again Some have Posterous and Tumblr micro-blogs too where once again they duplicate content and many can be more accurately described as social networking addicts than as bloggers or writers of any description.

      Cyberspace is full of heavily addicted social networking button clickers. They are a product of a society that’s being continually dumbed down and the more dumbed down they are the more they want to be just like every other dummy and have the exact same toys as them too. Why read and research, think and write when you can click buttons and exchange small talk all day with strangers?

      I’m hopeful that TPTB will see the need for an opt out button and provide one.

  53. I too am a big fan of WordPress.com and I to value my readers. For I feel that if they enjoy a blog post they will come back to my blog for more reading. After all… Is that not “traffic” is to a certain extent? Of course I could be wrong about that… The fact that it does not have a opt-out option seems lame. And in no way I plan to ever make my blog private. What’s the point in having a blog if everyone can’t read it?

    • Hi Lu,
      There’s a big difference between “traffic” and targeted readers. Targeted readers arrive on your blog looking for specific subject matter. Most come by way of search engine use or via the global tagging pages on their first visit. Some may arrive by happenstance but the majority don’t. They are seeking material and an opportunity to discuss specific subject matter.

      Targeted readers are more inclined to comment, return, become regular readers, and subscribe. They are more likely to promote your blog among their blogger friends and in social networks than “traffic” is. Targeted readers are the people who form blog centered communities.

      Traffic is a wave of incoming people who arrive due to the viral nature of a post or due to post being stumbled, dug, etc. or they may simply be browsing and find your site unexpectedly. A wave of traffic may contain some reader who do comment and return but most won’t.

      By not providing an opt out option wordpress.com has communicated one of two things. Either they did not anticipate a negative response or they did and they just don’t give a damn. Hopefully the the inflexible if you don’t like it … attitude is not a harbinger of things to come. It does not serve anyone business well to be seen in a position of making “my way or the highway” statements even if they harbor such opinions.

  54. It seems more like a tool that people can use to rip off your content. I already find my posts on sites which seem to collect blog posts of one niche (food in my case) with little or no reference to the author. Love WordPress – not sure about this ‘improvement’. Good idea to have an opt-out.

    • @Sally
      That was my initial response too. Although anyone can copy and paste a short excerpt and even use a thumbnail size image from another blog post without permission of the copyright holder and still remain in the confines of Fair Use, I never expected WordPress.com to release a tool like this and endorse this practice. Perhaps they are focused on becoming known as a microblogging platform as well as a blogging platform. If so then that’s the business of management but not providing an opt out feature and in essence taking the position of “if you don’t like it than make your blog private” is callous and unacceptable.

      • They are not within the confines of the Fair Use Treaty of the ( Berne Copyright Convention ) are they?

        http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ38a.html

        I think it’s a good idea to post a copyscape trespassing sign, and I absolutely post so every one can see: copyright:my name: the year…so they all know that what they are reading is copyrighted…the time in which they are reading it: and well, that’s about all I know on the matter, as well…as probably…the only GOOD thing that Slick Willy Clinton Ever did during his administration…of course, Monica Lewinsky might know of a few other moves…?

        • @sonsofthunder
          I am not a copyright lawyer and I don’t pretend to be one. I do believe that the position being taken by wordpress.com appears to be that their reblogging feature does fall within the parameters of Fair Use.

        • Maybe that Link needs critiquing, or, more than likely from the looks of it, it has already been critiqued to persuade bloggers, writers, and musicians to send uncle sam some library of congressional extra tax. But, from experience, as a song writer who has faced such a situation in court WITH a Library of Congress official Copyright…If Queen Nashville Parton steps in front of the right judge and shakes her booties… you aint got no more of a chance to win WITH a Library of Congress Copyright, than you do with a WordPressed time date and seal of approval stamp from Copy Scape…it’s like this:
          Yo Hona…I listen to foaty different un-published songs a week, from un-published aspiring song riahtars…I really caint hep it if some of they lyrics sticks in my mind….

          And of course, you know where the judges Eyes are stuck… Just Publish and stand on what you write…and in your case TiTi….take those suckas to cawart…I would!!!!

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